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Avoid costly treatment
12 Feb 2017 (213 views)

I met an English man two years ago. He married a Singaporean and now lived in Singapore. 

He told me that he would be visiting the UK to see his uncle. The uncle was in his late 50s and was terminally ill with late stage cancer and had only a few months to live. The NHS doctor said that there was nothing that could be done. His uncle accepted the advice. 

His uncle died six months later. He had lived a few months longer than expected.

Here is another story of a Singaporean family.

A woman in her mid 50s suffered from terminal cancer. She had been treated earlier but the cancer relapsed. The private doctor told the husband that she could be treated with new drugs. The estimated cost was $50,000.

The woman  died a year later. The total medical bill was $250,000. After the first attempt failed, the doctor advised the husband to try again. This was how the medical bills kept increasing. They did not work. The woman died anyway.

What is the moral of this story?

The uncle and the family accepted the advice of the NHS doctor, i.e. the doctor that worked under the National Health Service in the UK. They did not seek private treatment that would have cost them a fortune and probably bankrupt the family. They did what was reasonable and accepted the inevitable. 

Perhaps families in Singapore should also consider this approach.

Tan Kin Lian



 


Avoid costly treatment
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I met an English man two years ago. He married a Singaporean and now lived in Singapore. 

He told me that he would be visiting the UK to see his uncle. The uncle was in his late 50s and was terminally ill with late stage cancer and had only a few months to live. The NHS doctor said that there was nothing that could be done. His uncle accepted the advice. 

His uncle died six months later. He had lived a few months longer than expected.

Here is another story of a Singaporean family.

A woman in her mid 50s suffered from terminal cancer. She had been treated earlier but the cancer relapsed. The private doctor told the husband that she could be treated with new drugs. The estimated cost was $50,000.

The woman  died a year later. The total medical bill was $250,000. After the first attempt failed, the doctor advised the husband to try again. This was how the medical bills kept increasing. They did not work. The woman died anyway.

What is the moral of this story?

The uncle and the family accepted the advice of the NHS doctor, i.e. the doctor that worked under the National Health Service in the UK. They did not seek private treatment that would have cost them a fortune and probably bankrupt the family. They did what was reasonable and accepted the inevitable. 

Perhaps families in Singapore should also consider this approach.

Tan Kin Lian