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CaseTrust does not mean that the business entity is secure
24 Jan 2014 (0 view)  

Straits Times Forum

HAVING CaseTrust accreditation represents retailers' commitment to upholding the highest standards in fair trading and transparency. Indeed, many customers base their purchasing decisions on whether a particular retailer possesses such accreditation.

Therefore, how can a reputable tour company with CaseTrust accreditation close down suddenly, leaving customers in the lurch and affecting their Chinese New Year travel plans ("Five Stars closure disrupting CNY plans for thousands"; Jan 10)?

If this can happen to an established company like Five Stars Tours, how can customers have confidence in other CaseTrust-accredited travel agencies?

Where can affected travellers seek compensation and alternative arrangements, given the late notice?

Even though other tour agencies are willing to help, how would this affect the travellers' plans? Would the other agencies' customers be given priority over these affected travellers?

Five Stars also informed affected customers to make their claims through their travel insurance companies, the Small Claims Tribunals, or the Consumers Association of Singapore (Case).

But some travel insurance policies may not compensate policyholders in the event that the tour company fails to honour its contract.

The National Association of Travel Agents Singapore should work with the authorities and Case to better protect consumers.

Travel agencies applying for a licence should be required to put up a banker's guarantee, to help stranded customers in case they go bust.

Consumers cannot be left to fend for themselves. If no decisive action is taken, other CaseTrust-accredited tour companies may view these lapses as an excuse to let standards slip.

Five Stars clearly owes its customers a duty of care and must remain answerable for its actions.

Francis Cheng

 


CaseTrust does not mean that the business entity is secure
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Straits Times Forum

HAVING CaseTrust accreditation represents retailers' commitment to upholding the highest standards in fair trading and transparency. Indeed, many customers base their purchasing decisions on whether a particular retailer possesses such accreditation.

Therefore, how can a reputable tour company with CaseTrust accreditation close down suddenly, leaving customers in the lurch and affecting their Chinese New Year travel plans ("Five Stars closure disrupting CNY plans for thousands"; Jan 10)?

If this can happen to an established company like Five Stars Tours, how can customers have confidence in other CaseTrust-accredited travel agencies?

Where can affected travellers seek compensation and alternative arrangements, given the late notice?

Even though other tour agencies are willing to help, how would this affect the travellers' plans? Would the other agencies' customers be given priority over these affected travellers?

Five Stars also informed affected customers to make their claims through their travel insurance companies, the Small Claims Tribunals, or the Consumers Association of Singapore (Case).

But some travel insurance policies may not compensate policyholders in the event that the tour company fails to honour its contract.

The National Association of Travel Agents Singapore should work with the authorities and Case to better protect consumers.

Travel agencies applying for a licence should be required to put up a banker's guarantee, to help stranded customers in case they go bust.

Consumers cannot be left to fend for themselves. If no decisive action is taken, other CaseTrust-accredited tour companies may view these lapses as an excuse to let standards slip.

Five Stars clearly owes its customers a duty of care and must remain answerable for its actions.

Francis Cheng